Posts Tagged ‘Grindcore’

I am a sucker for brutal music that’s catchy and that’s not a mere technical wankery, and this album agreeably fulfills and defines that block of my taste. In outright drought of brutality of this sort from the local geographical sphere, I had been religiously waiting for this record to come out. After a series of failed attempts of the band trying to record their material, Binaash could finally do it in the beginning of 2012, and here we have – death metal full-length no. 3 from the Himalayan nation.

Having seen the band live and having been dehumanized by their wicked sets, I could only have anticipated more from this album. First listen and I had mixed feelings about this, especially due to the sloppy sound production values. It moved on, and the music was growing on me; and I was eventually picking up on ‘how’ to listen to this one.

I used to take Binaash’s music to have been concentrated with more percussive emphasis, with the drummer offering his wicked versatility and jazz fills and fusions, and it providing a distinct part of a listener’s focus. But here, after listening to “Binaashkaari”, I conclude it’s all riff-driven death metal that’s been forwarded. One could accuse the mixing that has done quite an injustice to the vile drumming, which has drowned under the heaviness of other instruments. But nonetheless, apart from that is above par, with the thick buzzing of guitars implementing the aural molestation. It is also evident that there is a distinguished difference in the sound quality in acoustic intros and metal tracks, the acoustic intros having a very neat touch.

As said, music is catchy as fuck, where the rudimentary formulae in brutal death metal have been twisted with synchronized atypical grooves, and most of the tracks have the distinct distinguishing sound that could discern it apart from others, e.g. “Swaagat” has this Gorguts tech-death meets thrash appearance, “The Wests” more or less reminds of Cryptopsy with a grind edge, “Eerie Sentiments” appears as a more groove-orientated manifestation, etc. The band’s key riffmeister, Prateek Neupane, although coming from old school death metal background seeks to experiment with newer ideas extending to putting breakdowns, ranging from Cryptopsy-like (“The Wests”) to Dying Fetus/hardcore breakdowns (“Eerie Sentiments”) and slam passages (“Waak”). So it’s all jumbled within and in display through the fifty-one minutes record. The Macabre/Gorerotted/Birdflesh styled humor that is put in has been a refreshing facet as well. Intros precede all tracks, which are mostly in forms of acoustic guitar presentations that don’t particularly go with the themes of the songs that follow, but add as chilling breaks amid the unrelenting brutality. The ‘fun’ element could be observed in these parts mostly, but lyrics of “Binaash Momo Pasal”, “Bancharo”, etc. also do emit that spark. For example, “Bancharo” is actually a conversation between a bird and a hunter (sick, amusing vocals for the bird’s part there). Lyrical themes of tracks vary from real-world serial killer stories to nihilism and from personal experiences to a tribute to the fans (the title track, “Binaashkaari”, meaning ‘destructor’ or ‘destructive’ is actually a reference to the band’s fan-base, where Binaash means ‘destruction’ in Nepali).

The immediate bands that come in mind to explain the musical style are early-day Cannibal Corpse, Dying Fetus and even Aborted with some grind on it, but the references are far more, with regular aforementioned breakdowns and old school tremolo-picked spices been used up. “Gravitational Imbalance” has a robust Deeds of Flesh glow with its technically played mosh-driving riffs. This track demonstrates the actual technical proficiency of the band.

Again about the drums, it is quite superbly done, yet it falls weak with the existing production. Rishav’s beats, since he’s come from jazz background, are pretty versatile and full of ideas, but it doesn’t save from its weak output. It’s hard to follow them at moments, and the sounds of cymbals are just blunt. The bass drums are nearly non-existent at times. What’s impressive though, about the production here is the furious bass of Bijent, the thick existence of which marks an impression, and is clearly and distinctly audible. The vocals range from grunts to growls (backing vocals). I have more preference over those sadistic low growls here, but the lead vocal is pretty interesting as well, that also contain screams to occasional squeals. Prabin has notably changed his style quite a bit compared to his days with Arachnids, which I take as a positive note.

In nutshell, this is some creative brutality, with lots of ideas being put up within. One may notice a slight shift of the songwriting style that varies between songs in the first half and the relatively newer songs in the second – the newer songs being shorter and more… ‘fun’! “Binaashkaari” doesn’t attempt to do anything new but they’ve fairly put forward a warm demonstration of their style of death metal with the groove, the fun particles and unrelenting brutality and catchiness, still pertaining to the members’ raw influences. Regardless of its cliched (yet raw) album art, some vicious music is in display, but it would have been more striking and have added much crisp if it was wrapped and presented with a bit better sound. Although a generic contender in the global death metal circle, it’s still quite a remarkable album of this style from the subcontinent, and which doesn’t apply programmed drums.

My dear friend Hassan Umer from Pakistan has assembled some awesome hardcore/sludge/grind/metal tracks by bands from throughout south Asia and beyond, and has released this compilation called “Rebellious Damnation Theories”. It’s just an online released (released Oct 28), you can download it via HERE.

[Track List]:

01. Jugaa – “Vultures Will Feed”
02. Bonecrushing Unity – “Open Your Eyes”
03. Sangharsha – “Insaniyaat”
04. Moron Crew – “Unity”
05. Foreskin – “Anger Management”
06. Pataca – “You are Dead to Me”
07. Dementia – “Sworn Annihilation”
08. Tormentstorm – “Slaughtered for Pleasure”
09. Nuclear Winter – Thrasher’s Cult
10. Herodah – “Hivemind”
11. Mysosis – “The Uncaring Strokes of the Master”
12. Bvlghvm – “LPC”
13. Bruxism – “Absolute Control”
14. Abusive Father – “The Epic as Fuck Tale About How Some Random Paki Dude on the Internet Asked Us to Do a Track for This Compilation”
15. Chillar Killer – “Bari Gal Kiti, La Lao Littar”
16. Ha5h on Death Drive – “Mango Juice”
17. Masturbate – “Methods of Ejaculation”
18. Gorified – “Obliteration Quandary”
19. Multinational Corporations – “Inhumanization”
20. Unholy Sermon – “Genocide Nations”
21. Necroticon – “Necrotic Truth”
22. Sledgehammer Autopsy – “The Cosmic Horror”
23. Death Inquisition – “Death Comes Ripping” (Live Misfits Cover)
24. Takatak – “Giant Song” (Live)
25. Inside 2 Stoopid Triangles – “Fuck Off Metalheads!” (Live)

The facebook event page for some more information if you wish…

Within a very short span of time, nearly four months, the Singaporean grindcore machine Wormrot have come up again with their EP called “Noise”. While their previous ‘full length’ was just above eighteen minute mark, this EP is only a little more than five minutes. Musically, this is the same Wormrot – no progression or shift in sound or whatever. And same with the productions.

I’ve always loved their apporach to grindcore, i.e. they seem to throw a very complex structured grindcore in an easy and straightforward manner, offered in grind as in similar style to Insect Warfare or Kill the Client. The regular Wormrot amalgation of hardcore, punk, crust, crossover thrash and metalcore ingredients in their music is evident, and the flow is designed well, while Arif balancing his throat with both growls and screams. But overall, this just seems to be a collection of the remnants they forgot to include in their last album, literally.

Thus nothing new is on the table, but a worthy-check-out if you like their older stuff. It’s a fair step that it was originaly released as a digital download then 10″ EP and CD by Earache Recs, haha.

So here goes my tiny review for the tiny EP. Grindcore!

[Originally interviewed for KtmROCKS E-Mag Issue 09]

So the Singaporean grindcore specialists Wormrot have greeted the world with yet another brilliant album “Dirge” a couple of months ago, and which has already burst a lot of balls throughout the globe. Here’s an interview with the band’s founding members, Arif (vocals) and Rasyid Juraimi (guitar).

Greetings from the Himalayas, yo! Firstly, I would like to congratulate Wormrot for the amazing worldwide response on your new album “Dirge”, which many would consider to be one of the best grindcore releases of this year already. So let me start with this: how would you define ‘grindcore’ yourself? And how would you define Wormrot?

Rasyid: Right now, I would say grindcore is a bastard child of punk and metal with less limitation. I would say Wormrot is a band that plays catchy tunes at a faster BPM.

So how did the band come into existence?

Arif: Wormrot started out as a death-grind project formed by me on vocals and Acit (Septikaemia, Hellghast) on drums. We took in Halim (Arbitrary Element, Cardiac Necropsy) to fill in the bass. I met an old high school friend Rasyid who had just completed his national service (2007) by a chance meeting through a mutual friend and was invited to try out on the guitars. A couple of jamming sessions followed yet we couldn’t find a comfortable stride. Rasyid and I decided to go on our own to form a grindcore band, retaining Wormrot as the band name. Fitri was a friend of mine in camp while we were in our national service. He fitted the empty drum slot comfortably. And hence was our current line-up positioned.

Hey, when I first heard the band name, I thought you guys would sing something on gore and disembowelments and necrophilia and stuffs, but you actually sing about… you know, some other things on life. I mean do the lyrical themes have anything to do with the world around, the society and politics pissing you off for some reason?

Arif: The lyrics are always about my own personal issues. We don’t have any hidden messages through our songs. Just a warning to assholes around the world not to fuck with us or rather me. We’re not a political band. Rarely would I incorporate the army negativity into our songs but at the same time making it humorous amongst the degrading words. Lyrical ideas will never fade. Personally, I’ve experienced tons of shit that are most likely to contribute to the theme.

I very much would like to stick the band’s style with that of Insect Warfare or Kill the Client. So what made you guys ending up with generating some no-bullshit, straightforward grindcore sound?

Rasyid: It actually came naturally to us. Like I said before, we just wanna play some catchy and easy-to-listen riffs. Simple aggressive music.

Tell us what you guys dig more personally – hardcore or death metal?

Rasyid: I’m going with hardcore. I never ‘get’ death metal.

Arif: All of the above. I can’t really say which one I prefer the most. Basically I listen to everything. Although I’m leaning more towards grind and powerviolence these days.

Well, there’s no bass in the band’s music and I came to know it was on purpose. Anyway, do you think you guys would hire someone on bass anytime in future?

Rasyid: NO!

Arif: 3 is a crowd.

Talking about your current record label, how did Earache Records first find you? Were you guys surprised or something at first to have known Digby Pearson, the label’s owner, was actually very impressed with the band?

Arif: Pretty much shocked actually. We were looking for a label to release our second album and we did ask some labels but we didn’t approach Earache cause we didn’t think they would be interested anyway. So when Digby himself messaged us in Myspace, I was refreshing the page a lot of times not believing what just happened. We could not believe it!

Well, and let me tell you that the music videos of songs “Spot a Pathetic” and “Erased Existence” you released in past couple of months were fucking amazing. I really liked the concepts. Anything on this? How was their making process like?

Arif: Both videos were recorded live in one of the shows during our US tour this year at The Blvd in LA. Earache and Dave, the videographer, did a tremendous job in coordinating for both videos.

Considering that an average Wormrot song lengths below one minute, how long does it take to write a song? How’s the songwriting process like?

Rasyid: It depends dude, sometimes it took less than 10 mins to write a good song, sometimes it took us 6 hours sparingly to come up with an ok song. For “Dirge”, we came into the studio with basically nothing, sometimes I didn’t even have a standby riff to play. It was really a ‘starting from nothing’ process.

Oh, that must have been a crazy experience then. Well, you guys have recently played your shows in US and Europe. How was the whole feel playing in those parts of the globe? How do those gigs differ from the usual Wormrot gigs in south-east Asia?

Rasyid: Actually we suffered from the ‘just another local band’ stigma (in Singapore), until we gained exposure from our touring, and recently, our signing to Earache. Maybe it shows that “hey we’re fucking serious and we’re here to make a difference”. We’ve been getting better attendance numbers in our recent gigs than our early years, definitely. Singapore’s a conservative crowd, but more and more are throwing their inhibitions on the moshpits.

How much have you noticed, in your career till now, that Asian bands are often overlooked by the metal world at other corners of the world?

Rasyid: It’s a sad unjust fact, but it’s not gonna change. We know, and have seen, many quality bands in Asia, but the spotlights are shining too brightly on the other side of the world that they are contented with what they have there. And unfortunately, people in Asia are tuning in to the West much more than they bother about what’s under their noses, contributing to the ‘just another local band’ stigma.

“Just another local band” stigma? Talking about it, I came to know the local bands in Singapore are often overlooked by the crowd there (bands playing in front of ten), while they agree paying even very big amounts to catch international groups live. Is it so?

Rasyid: Yes, it is and it’s common, nothing’s gonna change. That’s why we’re playing more shows in the US and UK. Sometimes you just wonder “why should I ever give a fuck about the Singapore scene”, and the answer lies in those 10 people watching the shows. That is a good enough reason.

That’s a great thing to hear, man. What are you guys’ day jobs by the way?

Rasyid: Right now I’m a driver in a furniture company.

Arif: I’m a freelance artist doing artworks for bands and I can be reached at my website ‘Rotworks’ (http://www.rotworks.net).

So what’s ahead of this, yo? I guess it’s too early to ask but when could we expect another Wormrot release?

Rasyid: FUCK OFF! NOT SO SOON! By the way, thanks for the interview dude!

Arif: A new one? Hahaha! Won’t be too soon brother. Thanks for the interview.

Thanks for the interview, guys. And all the best for everything that’s ahead.

You could check out more about the band through the following links:
http://myspace/wormrotgrind
http://facebook.com/wormrot
http://twitter.com/wormrot
http://wormrot.tumblr.com

– Interviewed by Awaken/The Sickening Art

So I was listening to this very album for a couple of days now, staying out the whole blogging business, and I must say it’s still kicking my arse constantly. I still am tuning on this one while writing the review, and I tend to keep this short for now.

Agathocles. I hadn’t heard this name from Belgium before, until one of my friend gave me “Thanks for Your Hostility” quite a time ago. I had completely ignored it for some reason for sometime and am just focusing it lately. And man… BANG!!! Why did I let it off my consideration for so long? So while I could see the band having released too many records in their lifespan, this one’s the only I’ve heard and from this, I could say this is a more punk sounding, less death-metallic grindcore, although there is a healthy blend of both. What had given me this feeling is the use of a more punk-leaning drumming, which quite often transform into really controlled blast beats here and there.

The riffs are very solid, and the music overall is real fun (grindcore = fun anyway) which offers a somewhat fuckin’ old school vibe. The production is a bit muddy, but it’s just brutal and suiting this way, with highly low tuned guitars and the vocals that employ both low note death growls, frequent high note screams and clean punk rock shouts as well. The songs lengths average one and half or two minute mark and it’s cool as well, typically grindcore. I love short length songs anyway.

All the tracks are distinct to some tiny degree, ranging from ultra-fast-paced tracks to slow sludgy/doomy ones, and all are cool to go through, but again, my picks would be…

“Distraction”
“Foul”
“My Reason”

So overall it’s a pretty enjoyable record. Highly recommended for any grind fan.

9/10

Shraap is a death metal/grindcore (home/studio) project of Pramithus Khadka (ex-Bitter Euphemism) on guitar, bass, drum programming and recording, and Prabin Shrestha (ex-Arachnids, Binaash) on vocals/lyrics. Besides the MIDI drums, the two songs might be two of the best recorded death metal tracks from Nepal yet:

“Shraap”: Download

“Dukha”: Download