Posts Tagged ‘Kalodin’

When Silence Entertainment first announced that this year’s Silence Festival will be headlined by the legends Vader, it was hard to believe for an instance. Vader has been one of the oldest and most consistent groups in the death metal world and while most of other death metal old-guards had been releasing substandard albums this year, Vader’s “Welcome to the Morbid Reich” was still competent in outperforming few of their older classics. So I was waiting anxiously for the day to come, October the fifteenth, and when it finally arrived, I couldn’t help but rush direct to the venue before an hour than the scheduled time.

We reached the festival ground at mid-day where there were only a handful of people gathered, volunteers, Garud security-men and few police to be seen around. Not only was I keen to mingle myself with the atmosphere but also as I had to miss two opening bands last year, being only an hour late. That was a great concert with great acts like Enigmatik (Switzerland), The Motherrockers Gang (Switzerland), E.quals and Binaash among others playing and this year, the bar was raised much, much higher. Thanks to Silence Entertainment!

Well… the stage was set-up beautifully and it seemed grand! The lights, the sound system, everything had their grandeur. It took a while and it was no late than 2 PM for the gig to kick off.

The festival Line-up:

Vader
Underside
Antim Grahan
Helmut
Commando Noise Terror
Kalodin
The Innercore
Hatebook

To start the event was the uprising local death metal group Hatebook. There were ongoing talks that the band has grown to a much tighter live act in their recent shows, and I was totally looking forward to this set. A bit muddy sound output in general, but they had delivered their best.

A quick sound-check with “Sphere of Madness” and then threw five crushing originals that featured influences ranging from Cannibal Corpse to Gorguts. Progressive elements were much evident in their newer songs, marked by numerous tempo changes and chilling Gorguts/Pestilence inclined riffing. This was the newer side of Hatebook’s music I hadn’t noticed before. Bivesh Thapa, their drummer was pounding the kit in a consistent fury backing up the vigorous band in front – quite impressive stage presence, especially of the vocalist and the bassist. Navin Pokharel was a monster behind the mic as always, bestowing with his diverse vocals range – growls to grunts and pig squeals. The crowd hadn’t still grown much big till then but it was a cool opening act for the day, the only notch down being the sound not being very clear.

Hatebook’s set-list:

Spartacus
Face of Death
Cadaver Militia
Precipitation of Human Flesh
Revenge

Then came The Innercore, a Hong-Kong based bunch of four Nepalese and a Philippino. They played metalcore, in style of Lamb of God meets As I Lay Dying. And since modern metalcore influenced by the Gothenburg sound is not my cup of tea, they didn’t get much of an attention from me. But pretty impressive stage gesture and they seemed to be having fun onstage and that’s what it matters the most. Did about half a dozen songs and I really adored the band’s drummer. I rest my case.

Next up were the local symphonic black metal outfit Kalodin who conquered the stage adorned with corpsepaints on. Their live sets have always been full of vivid atmosphere but this time they did it without all those lights on and thus it wasn’t as ambient in the daylight. Initially, Davin Shakya’s guitar had drowned behind the keys and drums, but they soon recovered the sound and began blasting continuously. They presented some five or six songs off their full length. But still, the sound output wasn’t much decent and the overall sound seemed unbalanced. Quite a disappointment from the guys I was having an expectation on, and having seen them twice already, this was their least appealing set for me.

Another thing is that they’ve being doing the same stuffs onstage all those times, and it seemed to be lacking the newness to a degree. Davin did put on show some of his immensely skillful shreds though, and the whole Dimmu Borgir-meets-power metal styled metal was commendable. All in all, they’re capable of bringing a much stronger performance than that, but things didn’t go well for them that day. They’re coming with an EP later this year, so I’m pretty excited on that note.

The first international act for the day was Commando Noise Terror, a solo project of Guido Wyss, drummer of Swiss brutal death metal band Enigmatik (/Near Death Condition, another killer death metal band), who had headlined the first edition of the festival last year. Finally, most of the audiences were on foot. He displayed his diverse talent in drumming, pummeling the kit in front of the tracks being played, which ranged from electronica to ambient flutes and jazzy metal to western classical. For the set, a different set of drums was employed and the guy had destroyed the skins, literally. The crowd cheered at him time and again, while he was exhibiting a very technical and creative side of extreme metal drumming. His set lasted for around half an hour and ended with a drum cover of Deicide’s “Scars of the Crucifix”, minus the vocals. He also did one on an eastern classical track (Anil Dhital – Kutumba collaboration, you remember?). Great set which took the gig on the next level!

Then came Helmut, another Swiss act. This band was out of my focus for whatever reasons, until they showed up what they’re capable to delivering on stage. A pleasant surprise and one of the best performances of the day, Helmut played music blended of everything heavy metal, doom, sludge, punk, rock, blues, mathcore and whatnot! Their set started with a company of the local guitar maestro Anil Dhital (E.quals/White/Lakhe) who had presented his sitar skills along Helmut’s music. This was the first time I actually saw him playing the instrument and it was mind-blowing!

And then when the band began to play their slow, doomy riffs, it all blew the stage away. Real catchy riffs and which were SUPERHEAVY!!! I digged the band’s music. The vocalist used from clean singing to Meshuggah-ish screams and growls and was little eerie but flew perfect with the music, which also stretched to easy ZZ-Top influenced blues segments. Equally exciting was their stage presence – really splendid and easy-with-the-stage, they were real fun to watch, especially the bassist. They really know how to rock n’ roll! I learned that their new CD is being distributed for free in Tone Music Store, so go grab them up real fast if you loved the guys.

Then onstage were Antim Grahan, the local black metal giants. The light of the day had completely escaped beyond the horizons by this time and which had only made the ambience more elegant. This time, the band didn’t have any face-paint, fake blood or the pig head as before. They came in and straightaway delivered their material.

The instruments beside the drums weren’t much discernible at the beginning, but they leveled up quickly. There were a number of mess in their playing but overall, it was a tight set. It was cool that they included new as well as older songs in their set-list, including the cover of “Hallowed Be Thy Name”. Well, this had come on-the-spot, since the crowd was cheering to hear the song played (which is really pathetic! The crowd still favors covers to originals?!?) Thus it came all unprepared and it could be observed since the bassist was relying on Pankaj Shakya (one of their guitarists) to know what to play further. Nonetheless, they pulled it off, but it was their weakest that day. It was the first performance of the band with their new bassist, Kunjan Shrestha, formerly of Wings of Spasm.

Surya was furious as always with his drumming, who was one of the highlights of the set, completely destructive while entering brutal blast segments. Vocals from Parash Shakya were also clearly audible, calming my complaint that they weren’t much loud in few of their previous sets. Overall, it was a mixed set, and which also invited the crowd to the pit. The sound released was quite awesome, if not flawless.

Antim Grahan’s set-list:

300
The Ruin of Immortals
Winter Blossom of Ceremonial Grief
I, Lucifer
Infected
With Vengeance I Bleed
Hallowed Be Thy Name (Iron Maiden cover)
Pashu Samrajya

Underside were next, the band featuring the members of E.quals, and Bikrant Shrestha, the key organizer of the festival, added. I had thought this band to be metalcore although being tagged ‘modern metal’, but turned out to be a little more than that, more or less. Their music consisted of thrash, groove metal and hardcore punk ingredients as well. I’ve always loved E.qual’s stage persona, if not their form of music so much, and same was the case here, plus I was actually enjoying Underside’s music, which wasn’t as technical as E.quals’ though. Energetic band and the commanding front-man, Underside proved to be the tightest local act to perform that day. They did about four or five songs, and since I was too excited longing for Vader, I couldn’t concentrate much on them after a while. All in all, they released a perfect sound output and created headbang frenzy in the crowd. Great set!

And after a long wait, Vader finally showed up. The field was full of around two thousand who were desperately waiting for the legends to arrive and commence the mayhem. Quite a bit of time consumed as separate sets of speakers were unfolded and the drums’ set was also replaced by the larger one that was used by CNT earlier. And finally the intro with haunting keys came on track, “The Dark Side” originally from Star Wars to be specific, and it felt the skies were tearing apart and the demons were arriving down on earth.

The tall men arrived and then in no time started demolishing with one song after another. Peter initially had few problems with the monitors and it raged him a bit but it was cool that he later apologized for the muddle (he actually kicked one of the monitors in front of him). The big man also messed a lead solo in the first song in the process of confusion. But then what followed were fifteen other songs, presented flawlessly, with absolute precision. Obviously, they had the best sound output among all other bands that day with every note hit audible and they were just tearing apart the stage. Great stage persona, cool interaction with the crowd and most importantly, brilliant music. Paul actually greeted with namaste’s at instances between the songs, which was cool.

James Stewart, their English drummer was blasting his drums like a machine relentlessly driving the madness foster. Hell broke loose and there were two separate pits in two halves of the ground and both pits turned out pretty huge and violent.

Just when Vader announced their last song, the crowd went “Raining Blood, Raining Blood” (pathetic again, the crowd favors Vader covering songs as well… hinting them the crowd actually loves Slayer’s songs more than Vader’s own? It’s a pity). But then again, they had two great covers of “Black Sabbath” and “Raining Blood” at the end. They made the former sound even more evil while the pit had broadened its territory during “Raining Blood”. After the set, the band members gathered to thank the audience, while Peter greeted with “Subharaatri Kathmandu”, which came much as a thrilling surprise, haha.

Vader’s set-list:

Sothis
The Crucified One
Black to the Blind
Shadow Fear
Come and See My Sacrifice
Kingdom
Dark Age
This is the War
Impure
Wings
Silent Empire
Black Sabbath (Black Sabbath cover)
Raining Blood (Slayer cover)

(and two or three others I cannot remember names of)

The clock had already pointed 10 PM and we rushed happily back our homes. A great historical day for a small underground scene like ours! Best. Gig. Ever!!!

I would like to thank Silence Entertainment for pulling off such a great event like this and which in itself is a huge milestone in the local scene. And I hope more gigs like this would be organised in future. Kudos to the Silence crew!!!

[The above pictures were taken by Umes Shrestha of KtmROCKS. They are posted here with permission.]

This review is not available. Go listen to your cunnin’ metalcore bands that I love to bash. So that I could take a chillful nap. Wake me after the ’12 apocalypse or something, ya’ll. Cheers!

KtmROCKS Nepal, after a long time, has just released its second volume of “Be Loud Be Proud” compilation.

1. STS – Bidroh (7:29)
2. Bidroha – Adhipatya Ho Danav Ko (5:47)
3. Earthling – Wilderness Throne (6:08)
4. Kalodin – Souls of the Dead (7:12)
5. Crucifixia – End of War (4:09)
6. Diwas Gurung – Haami Aayau (4:32)
7. Hadez – End of Days (8:19)
8. Symbol of Orion – Monopoly (3:36)
9. Dipes Karki – Gore (3:16)
10. Deadefy – Doom’s Day (3:28)
11. Saboteurs – Angel and Her Love (4:26)
12. Antim Grahan – Putrefaction Eternity (3:12)

Download

(Originally interviewed for KtmROCKS Emag 08)

Kalodin is a symphonic black/death metal band based in Nepal and Singapore. Here’s an interview with the band’s guitarist and the ‘brain of Kalodin’, Davin Shakya:

Hi Davin, thanks for granting me this opportunity to interview you! For those who haven’t listened to your music yet, could you please define Kalodin briefly – the band, the sound and how it all got started?

Davin: Greetings Samyam! We appreciate your effort in this brother, and thanks for the interview. “Kalodin”, is a word play of Nepali language literally translating “Black Day”. At the time when I was trying to brainstorm on our band’s name, I thought of few other possible names until I found out that those were already taken. And I knew I had to sort of imprint our background onto the name, hence the name, “Kalodin”, which metaphorically means “Dark Age” in Nepali.

Kalodin consists of:

Davin Shakya: Guitars, keys, backup vocals and sound engineer
Rai: Bass, graphic designer
OmEO: Guitar, video editor
Gobinda: Drums

During our “torture” era, we were just starting out as a metalcore band and as we aged, we started getting heavier and heavier – from metalcore to thrash metal to melodic death metal to symphonic black/death metal. And now, we have finally found our ‘signature’ touch that we establish in all the songs that we write. Spanish/Arabic vibe is a part of our whole song writing process not forgetting war/the downside of humanity/sex/religion.

Speaking of sound, we played with different musicians during our growth towards the present – different drummers, different guitarist and bassists. But we soon realized that in mean time, we will have to part ways due to my visa issue in Singapore. So I had to decide whether to stick with the lineup or move on, and decided to move on. Thus, explaining why we used MIDI drums on our whole production in “The Bestial Ritualism of Harlotry” and the parting of our ex-vocalist, Kiew Jay Joel from Singapore who played a huge role in Kalodin.

We recently recruited an official member once from Garudh, Gobinda on drums. But Ashis and Sanjay, from Garudh are also sessioning for us for our tours in Nepal.

And we have the luxury of a home recording studio so I can’t deny that we cut cost during our production stage but trust me, my balls grow white hair upon completion.

It’s not fun anymore man. It’s our way of life. Kalodin is our legacy and our destiny we can’t afford to fuck up. And I’ll do whatever it takes to honor this name and watch it go really far with the help of our members and fans!

It’s been sometime that Kalodin released the debut studio album “The Bestial Ritualism of Harlotry”, which was produced independently by the band itself. How have been the responses till now?

Davin: The responses have been all positive so far besides the MIDI drums!

Kalodin at Putrefaction Gig in Pokhara, Nepal

Kalodin recently played in Pokhara Putrefaction Gig in Pokhara and you said it was the best thing that has happened to you. You want to share something on it?

Davin: It was in fact the best live gig we ever played in our history! Our first make-up attempt was a complete success! The stage was outdoors with just sky as the ceiling! The lighting was pretty good. We FINALLY got to tour with our good friend, Antim Grahan. And most importantly, THE FANS WERE ABSOLUTELY CRAZY!!! Those guys were fucking awesome, supporting us from the start till end, taking photos with us! We did feel like rockstars in that moment! But what makes a rockstar? The answer is simple – our family, our friends and fans who keep supporting us in every move we partake to strive for the better!

Any interesting moment in the tour you’d like to share with us?

Davin: Haha, there are many moments that we won’t be able to forget! Kalodin’s version of “Eddie”, LIGU! was kind enough to buy some spaghetti and rub it all over the hotel room’s wall and puking all over the toilet, getting fucked up with great friends! Ligu nearly threw a TV set out of the window but I guess he realized we were all there on budget, hahaha! We also got to explore the beautiful places of Pokhara! It was awesome.

And you guys are also touring a couple of other towns in Nepal with Antim Grahan?

Davin: Yes, It’s an honor!

The Singaporean metal scene, as I know, is fucking huge, with frequent visit of world famous groups. What do you say about the Singaporean metal scene yourself?

Davin: Well yes the ‘scene’ there is great. Great international bands tour Singapore all the time. Maiden’s coming on February. People do not mind paying ALOT for these bands. But I am very disappointed with the local scene there. Bands playing in front of a crowd of 10. Let me just put it this way – the local metal scene there is bad. But some bands there are amazing! They truly are.

So till now, what differences have you noticed in between playing in Singapore and playing in Nepal? The atmosphere? The bands? The fans?

Davin: Well yes, the atmosphere is entirely different. As mentioned before, Singapore’s local metal scene is pretty bad. But that didn’t really affect us because we were the headliners. As for the bands that we played with in Singapore, they are awesome! But a little more attention from the audiences’ side would be great! These bands deserve to be heard man!

In Nepal though, everything was different. The fans were crazy! The stage set-up, and the unity of metalheads in Nepal! And that is important. Unity! For in the family of metal, we are one!

Since the band members are/were dispersed in two different countries most of the time, how did you manage the making and recording of songs all those time? How did the whole process go?

Davin: It started when I was in India studying Audio Engineering. Our vocalist at that time, Joel and Rai were in Singapore. So being the main songwriter, I compose something and send the mp3 file over to them by email. Upon receiving it, they will add their own stuff on it and send it back to me. The songwriting and recording process were done through these means. Joel recorded his vocals in a professional studio in Singapore while Rai bought an audio interface and recorded using that. They then send me all the completed files and I’d mix and master them altogether. It was a long, dreary process but we still pulled it off.

Kalodin’s music has symphonic, black, death, melodic death, progressive, power as well as heavy metal elements. Was it a sort of experimentation? Who are your primary influences behind the music?

Davin: We weren’t really experimenting. Instead, we tried to evoke different emotions in different parts of every songs thus the perception of various sub-genres of metal in our music. Our main influences are Dimmu Borgir, CoF, Behemoth and artists from Roadrunner Records.

There had been a lack of stable drummer with the band since the beginning, which had also led the band employing programmed drums in the album. In the mean time, Kalodin recently added Gobind as the official drummer of the band. Anything you want to say on the drumming department?

Davin: Well, like I mentioned above. We went through a great deal of changes in the past and because of geographical difference, we had to resort to MIDI drums to fill up the void in our production. But now that Gobind has joined the band, we will be releasing an EP with live drums intact! We want to brush away any doubt that we can’t do without a drummer which is going to require a hell lot of work and experimenting on the audio production side.

And Kalodin also released “The Divulgence”, a promotional package/compilation set of the album in Nepal?

Davin: No, “The Divulgence” isn’t an official initiation. We did this so that we can market our music for much cheaper rate. It is basically a compilation of 4 tracks from the album.

So how many copies of the album/package do you think were sold in Nepal?

Davin: The music industry here for metal isn’t up to the international caliber. And our price is too expensive for the market here so we didn’t really sell much. In fact, it was below 20 copies. We hope to see the market flourish in due time! It’s about the art’s integrity and yes, we do need money to upgrade our gears, don’t we?

We’ve learned that the band is working for the next EP already, which is said to come out in few months, probably. How’s it going?

Davin: We have already started writing new materials but it’s going to be a total surprise! So I won’t spoil it now. But we are going to make it such that fans will be able to download it!

That’s great. It suggests the band is going to shift a bit of direction in the EP musically?

Davin: Yes definitely! That’s the whole point. It’s going to be more brutal and darker.

Well, we were stunned (hehe) to get you playing with corpsepaint in Putrefaction Gig. I can say that you guys were the first in Nepal that actually did the make-ups for a live show. How were the comments?

Davin: Haha! It took balls of steel for us to do that man! We were certain that “golveda” (tomato) was gonna be all over our attire at the end of our set! Amazingly enough, nothing happened! Instead, fans respected that and took lots of photos with us which was an honor! We thank our fans for their support!

So what does the corpsepaint actually try to signify when talking about Kalodin?

Davin: Right now, it’s just a new face of the band. I know that our current music and the corpsepaint don’t match. But the whole make-up situation was implemented so that we can make an appearance as KALODIN instead of 6 different individuals. When the make-up comes off, we’re simply who we are outside Kalodin. But when the make-up’s on, we rock out as ONE. For our upcoming EP, our genre is going to be well suited with our appearance.

While talking about the philosophy behind Kalodin’s music, are you guys really into all those Satan stuffs personally?

Davin: I can write about this the whole night, but I’m not going to. Every individual is subjected to their own beliefs. Before answering your question, look around what’s happening in this world. It’s good to be optimistic in life but one has to be pessimistic too, to embrace the way of life. We are NOT Satanists but we do not overlook its teachings either. Our music is mostly about Atheism which is presented in the most metaphorical way possible using religion, sex and war as the references, rebelling against the ones who put you down. Against the fucking system, the transition of the old world and the new world in which, during the process has been defiled by men and lastly the APOCALYPSE which awaits us!

Our goal is to instill our music and lyrics in different minds, interpreting our words in 100 different ways. Everyone’s got a different story after all.

Lastly, few words you’d like to share with fans, friends and foes?

Davin: We, Kalodin embrace our friends’ and fans’ undying support from the bottom of our hearts. We will keep the brutality alive and spread our music… Worldwide! We will not disappoint. As much as we’re enjoying, creating our work, we’d like you to enjoy it MORE listening to it! We’d like to thank all our supporters! And as for our foes, who gives a fuck about them?

Kalodin thanks KtmROCKS, Antim Grahan and all our fans for believing in us and aiding us in every way possible! And thank you Samyam, for the interview!

Thank you, Davin. We wish you all the best for your upcoming EP, the tour and everything that’s ahead!

– Interviewed by Samyam Shrestha

(Originally reviewed for KtmROCKS)

Honestly, I am no big fan of the symphonic metal or black metal thing in general, and have listened to lesser amount of black metal than let’s say, brutal death metal or thrash. Even bands like Emperor and Arcturus fall short to keep me engaged after a listen, whereas Equilibrium (Ger) and Negura Bunget may just do the thing sometime. It’s not about experimentations or the taste, may not even be the hazy old school productions tending to defy modern bedroom brutal death metal for its tendency to fuck a listener’s ears. Thus, considering that Vesania is the one name that instantly comes to my mind when hearing the genre name and Om, I can think of as my favorite album in the subgenre right now, I often lean to seek for the ‘it’ in every other music I listen to, in relation or in comparison to these ‘good’ bands. Saying these, I think the band in hand currently, Kalodin, after having a few listens have hit me hard enough, informing about the sharp existence of the ‘it’. Well…

Kalodin play symphonic metal inclining towards black/death metal with progressive, gothic, traditional heavy metal and power metal constituents also noticeable in their music. All these things jumbled, the final sound crafted could be rather distinctive in itself, like what we’ve been offered here in this LP. Still, the band doesn’t tend to stop here and notifies us about their unconsciousness towards setting boundaries. Wah-wah solos from surface of classic rock n roll… in black metal? Heard before? At least I haven’t (or am I too naïve?). Things are a little stretched from what it would have been otherwise, hence forming a sort of an original version of what it is called symphonic black/death metal. The closest I could match their sound right now is with the Indian monsters, Demonic Resurrection, who had also experimented with the very aforementioned musical styles in precision, to win worldwide attention. I don’t know if there is even any DR influence there in the musicians in actual though.

Now.

The keyboard marks its dominant existence in the release, supplying the general ambience to the songs and forming a melancholic atmosphere throughout. The string ensembles don’t attempt to drown the guitars, and there’s an extent of utter balance and organization between the two – keyboards have their own moments and the guitars have their own. But overall, I can sense it would have been a little barren if the synths were to be erased in entirety. It’s not that there aren’t any keyboard-free parts, and these sound splendid too, like in In Glorificus Luctus…, past the acoustic/ambient phase. At other moments, it’s good enough that the keys have trailed with haunting followings in aid to the strong guitars, without infecting their aura.

Guitars, as said, have their own moments – from interludes and acoustic passages to lead solos – Davin Shakya, the brain of Kalodin, behinds the axes, have composed everything with splendor. There aren’t much chugs and tremolos, setting them apart from the trend of writing an entire black metal song through one-note-thirty-two-hits alone. And the song structures are pretty varied – from complex sounding Forsaken Virgin Demonlord to easy but vigorous Face of War. Technicality isn’t the primarily focused facet as the riffs don’t sound difficult, but one may clearly state where the technicality lurks when a piece like the beginner of Souls of the Dead rolls in. The riffs may also provide similitude with several other bands at times, like the beginner of Forsaken Virgin Demonlord, which may exactly fit in any blackened death era Behemoth album; Necrophiliac contains a certain proportion of gothic (Cradle of Filth, maybe) vibe; while the guitar solo accompanied section near the Face of War opener may adjust in any decent progressive rock/metal song. So saying that this album has something for everyone may not be incorrect. But as said, if you wish to subtract their sound on one band, think of Demonic Resurrection.

Kiew Jay Joel’s vocals have done a big favor to this release. His vocals range from high pitched shrieks, typical in black metal standards, to low Nergal sound-alike death growls, which have only made the things more absorbing. Here is also an inclusion of female vocals, in Interlewd: Into Purity, and it, to a huge level reminded me of Antim Grahan’s similar track When Silence Mourns, especially because of the female vocals, approach of the keyboard and the drum beats. Were the band listening to The Ruin of Immortals while writing this track? May be.

Since Kalodin have no drummer, the drums are programmed here. It’s reasonable enough to have applied this alternative in a circumstance that there’s no drummer in the band and all members are scattered over different regions of the continent. An excuse? I don’t think so. But the programmed drums do not sound artificial at all. If you think machined beatings do not go with this form of music at all, you may want to think it again this time… unless it’s the full-pace double bass part of Souls of the Dead. Yes, you could find plenty of other cases where human beatings have sounded more mechanic than these. Thank the production that it has attempted to make the drums sound as human as possible. Moreover, the album as a whole is produced tremendously and besides, everything has been mixed well so that you could hear every note being hit, even on the bass, which is plainly audible. It seems Davin Shakya knows his shit of how to catch a perfect output for an ideal composition.

All in all, the songwriting is really commendable with loads of delightful moments sealed within. It’s really tough to discern apart better songs from other good ones. One thing, I don’t know if it was intentional or not, but I could sense that as the album runs along, the songs turn less brutal and bends more towards melodic harmonies. Progressive tendencies?

So The Bestial Ritualism of Harlotry may be one of the finest releases in symphonic black metal I’ve heard recently, and is also likely to go well with the followers of any other metal subgenre than that. But if you’re a brutal DM extremist or something like that, then why are you even reading this anyway?

Stand-out Tracks:
Forsaken Virgin Demonlord
Dark Whisperer
Souls of the Dead

8/10

…and did I say that I am still chuckling at the album title and the artwork? Haha.

– Samyam Shrestha